Supercharged Supra

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JustenGT8

New Member
Messages
2,433
Location
Canberra, Australia
Underdrive not undersize ;) So yes larger

I have no a/c so just the PS and crank pulley would need to be sent i guess. Alt is my main worry as they don't like sustained high revs.

New setup should be running this weekend but i'll give it a dyno and track day and if i like it i'll look into these pulley's for sure :)
 

cribbj

"Supra" Moderator
Staff member
Messages
4,786
Location
Houston, TX
On another subject, why don't you consider adding some of the soundproofing like I used? I used two different types...One was a tar based aluminum backed lining that is most excellent in absorbing sound, and the other is a neopprene like substance that is also aluminum backed. The neoprene type is exceptionally light weight.

Ryan
Ryan, it's already done. Somewhere around post 650/652 I mentioned the 140lbs of Cascade Audio Engineering (http://www.cascadeaudio.com/) deadening that went in. Wow, what a difference! A Supra that is as quiet as a Lexus. As you did, they used aluminum backed neoprene, a plus a lead/foam sandwich sheet for the console & floorboard, spray and more neoprene inside the doors, plus the spray and neoprene in the roof.

I still think there's a bit more to be gained by removing the inner fender liners and putting some spray or foam sheets in there, which we may do in the future.
 

cribbj

"Supra" Moderator
Staff member
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4,786
Location
Houston, TX
I decided to "moderate" my own thread, and just deleted several posts because they contained inaccurate information about this Gilmer pulley set. I discovered the crank pulley actually has 60 teeth (confirmed by counting - 3 times), not 64, as I was informed by Endevour. And I now have all the stock pulley diameters (thanks again for the assist, Scott!), which makes a side by side drive ratio comparison easier. So here's the final table of drive ratios:



All accessories are underdriven from the stock setup, but the A/C pulley is now underdriven about 86% from what it was, which is too much IMO. So I've asked Endevour if they can take the existing A/C pulley, and machine it down a bit and reduce the tooth count from 59 to 49, as I don't want to lose any A/C capacity here in Houston, TX.....
 

cribbj

"Supra" Moderator
Staff member
Messages
4,786
Location
Houston, TX
Here's a couple shots of the P/S, A/C and dampner pulleys test fit on my mule/mockup motor. As soon as I figure out how to get the [email protected]#$%^ pulley off the alternator, I'll put the new one on that too.

The A/C pulley is a perfect fit, close, but no rubbing at all, and I don't think there should be any problems reducing its OD. I'm going to reroute that A/C clutch cable just to be sure.

My camera is having an off day ;) - the flash made the A/C pulley look yellow, which it's not:



 

1uzvl

New Member
Messages
348
Location
Perth Australia
Are you returning the a/c to the same ratio as factory??

Was just wondering how much margin there is in the slip sensor on the compressor if its ran too slow or is that not been used.

I havent read the whole thread it appears quite long so the answer may already be there.
 

cribbj

"Supra" Moderator
Staff member
Messages
4,786
Location
Houston, TX
Yep, same ratio as factory. I think the slip sensor's purpose is to detect a frozen, or otherwise nonmoving compressor, and it tells the A/C amplifier to disengage the clutch. I think/hope it has nothing to do with the pulley ratio, but I'm no A/C expert, so I'd appreciate any advise from those who are.
 

1uzvl

New Member
Messages
348
Location
Perth Australia
they will trip out even if the belt is a little loose especialy on start up of the compressor.If you where to run the compressor slower than factory it may detect a fault as the compressor speed is checked against engine speed but how much tolerance there is i dont know.

If the ratio is the same it should change the speed and therefore wont cause issues.
 

cribbj

"Supra" Moderator
Staff member
Messages
4,786
Location
Houston, TX
Then on the mechanical side, I took the intake manifold over to my fabricator/machine shop buddy and had the recessed bosses for the mounting holes opened up a bit so I can now get flange nuts in there and a socket or box wrench to tighten them. When I switched from allen head cap screws to studs & nuts, I discovered the manifold mounting holes were drilled off center, and 1-2 were right up against the bosses, making it nearly impossible to get nuts on the studs and turn them. Dennis had to “make” some special thin wall nuts, and they were a real bear to get on & off:



Also had some holddown tabs welded on my SS fuel rails, so that system is finished now, and ready for leak checking:



Here, we’re rigged up on my little hydraulic pump and holding 100psi nicely; I didn’t want to go much higher with the pressure as I didn’t know how much the injectors would handle:

 

cribbj

"Supra" Moderator
Staff member
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4,786
Location
Houston, TX
Just a brief update on the carputer. After living with my relocated batteries, and the carputer for a short time (two weeks?) I decided I wasn’t happy with a few things, so I decided to reroute a cable or two. Next thing you know, the interior of the car looked like this:



To make a long story short, I pulled out, shortened, cleaned up, tightened or eliminated nearly every cable that was installed for the carputer & new audio system, except the speaker wiring, which was still the OEM wiring from Toyota. Seems wherever a 1 foot cable would have been optimum, a 6 footer was installed, and the excess was coiled up and stuck wherever it would fit. In several cases, where the original cable was plenty long enough, there was an extension cable installed too! So here’s the pile of excess cables I pulled out:



Then I decided to move the carputer’s external interface jacks from the inside of my center console:



To the front dash:



The first cavity on the left has the pushbutton for my engine prelube system, and the jack next to it is for an iPod A/V input. The next cavity is a USB port, and the last cavity has an HDMI port. Not yet sure why, or to where I would output HDMI, but the only other possibility was an Ethernet jack, and that’s not needed ‘cause the carputer already has WiFi capability. I had a 3rd hole to fill, and although I was tempted to throw another USB port in, I opted for the HDMI. These jacks looked very inconspicuous and tidy inside the center console, but unfortunately they couldn’t be used unless the lid was left open, so they weren’t very practical.

Additionally, I’d been having visions of my two, 20lb Odyssey batteries flying off this back shelf and paying me a visit in the front seat during a panic stop so I had this battery bracket fabbed up, and I installed it yesterday:



I also eliminated some spare +12v power cabling I’d installed six years ago “for the future”, and rerouted my fuel pump power leads, and the Kenne Bell trigger cable. Put all this stuff in the right & left hand sill cavities where it should have gone years ago, instead of draped across the floor boards, under the carpet.
 

cribbj

"Supra" Moderator
Staff member
Messages
4,786
Location
Houston, TX
Door & Dash Panel Refinishing

As I'm home from work for two months, recuperating from my little heart attack, I have more time on my hands than usual. So I started another little side project: refinishing the dash & door panels on my son's black car.

I don't know if the Lexi suffer from this problem, but the early MKIV Supras had a rubberised antiglare coating on their plastic dash & door panels, and while it may have looked OK initially, it doesn't wear well. Here's a photo of the driver's side door mounted switch panel that I just took out of the black car:



Pretty bad, and several of the dash panels aren't much better. So, a number of Supra owners have elected to refinish these panels, but the trick to a good refinishing job is getting the rubberised coating off, without destroying the plastic underneath.

There are a number of threads on SF about this, and people have used a number of different solvents and abrasives to get the stuff off, with varying degrees of success. Unfortunately, most of the solvents seem to attack the plastic if left on too long. There are a number of horror stories where people have left solvent on too long and melted their panels, and then tried to "fix" them with bondo, etc. Pretty sad. The abrasive approach isn't any better, as it gums up rapidly with the rubber coating and then becomes ineffective.

So I decided to try a lineup of different solvents to see what worked and what didn't. I had a selection of Acetone, MEK, Lacquer thinner, Brake Cleaner, Carb Cleaner, ATF, Brake Fluid, and Gunk Engine Degreaser.

To make a long story short, the first five solvents were too aggressive, and attacked the plastic, without really doing a superb job on the rubber coating. And of the last three, the ATF and Gunk were pretty ineffective.

However, the brake fluid was like magic in a bottle. No kidding; I simply poured some on a rag, wiped it on the rubberised coating, and could literally rub the stuff right off, and best of all, it didn't attack the plastic at all.

Here's a shot of the same piece, after the coating was removed. This represents "maybe" 10 minutes of work, with most of the time spent trying to get into the tight areas:



Next step, pull all the dash panels, clean them with brake fluid, then surface prep for the primer, and final paint.
 

cribbj

"Supra" Moderator
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4,786
Location
Houston, TX
That's just what it looked like under the rubber coating. I'll be roughing it up a bit with some sandpaper, steel wool or scotch brite soon.

As I'm no paint expert, if anyone has experience prepping & painting plastics, feel free to jump in.
 

stevechumo

Active Member
Messages
3,055
Location
OC, City of Sunshine
Brake fluid! I never thought it's a mild cleaner. For painting plastic, Pepboys has some spray to paint for plastic or soft/stretching material, but you'll be limited to the color option.

If you really want it to look good and to be durable, here's what I'd do as painting on car:

1) Sand the bare material smooth. Final sanding can be wet sand with 320 grit.
2) Spray primer. Spray can should be fine. Final sanding can be wet sand with 500 grit.
3) Color coat. Any color of choice with automotive spray can for a tri-stage painting. Don't sand at all.
4) Clear coat. Spray can is fine. 3 coats are what I prefer. Wet sand with 1500, 2000 grit. And rub it out with rubbing compound and then real fine polishing compound.

The end product will look as good as the car's exterior paint. :p
 

cyberdiamond

Member
Messages
158
Location
Adelaide Australia
General consensus was goo-off (or goo-gone) stuff for removing the sticky mess left from removing adhesive stickers.
I was going to try citroclean or citra-gel (sp?) orange/citrus based cleaner.

Good info on the brake cleaner (haven't heard that one before) just be sure you clean it VERY well before painting or the paint will bubble.

I have to cut one of my panels to fit the proefi dispay gauge where the stock clock goes and may have to do this if I mess up the coating and need to repaint. My dash panels haven't suffered much yet but the car does reasonably low k's

As for paint I would use plastic primer after roughing up the surface with 600 grit and see, maybe a bumper paint and not clear it. Or just leave it in the plastic primer which almost gives the same sort of look as factory.
I'm guessing that you don't really want a shiny finish on the dash but maybe you do, if so a gloss clear after your colour choice is fine.

Hoping you make a full recovery.
 

cribbj

"Supra" Moderator
Staff member
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4,786
Location
Houston, TX
Thanks Steve, I'm good with all that except the clear coat, as I don't want a glossy finish.

The guys over on SF have been using DupliColor brand, Bumper paint. It's intended for urethane bumpers, but it apparently works on plastic dash panels, and they say the color is spot on.

A couple have used professional bumper paint, available only at automotive paint stores, and they say it works well too.

Cyber, the brake CLEANER was too aggressive, and attacked the plastic. It was actually brake FLUID that worked so well in the end.
 
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