Project SC400TT

SC400TT

Moderator
In this project, I am doing something that has rarely been done before in a Lexus SC400. Even though there have been a few TT SC400 cars designed as one-offs out there, none have proven to be too successful (the exception recently being chrisman and his great project, and not including the Anderson Audio SC430 project), and the cost to do so has, in most cases, been prohibitive. My goal is to design, develop and implement a cost-effective, reliable Single Turbo SC400 that can be duplicated and sold as a partial kit for those that want to add the “oomph” of fun into their Luxo-Cruiser. As mentioned above, I have dubbed this project SC400T. I wish to note that I have had three people that have contributed many hours of their valuable time in helping me to put this project together, without whom, I would not have been able to attempt this project. So, I wish to offer many thanks to the noted David Phan, aka, LEXTREME, also to Joe Guthrie of Turbo Performance Systems, who is also a partial sponsor and confidant of my project, and last but not least, David Noble of Blown Engineering, the welding wizard who will integrate all the parts, weld my pipes and put together a large part of my turbo project.. This page will be updated as my project progresses, and will document my progress of Project SC400T. Keep in mind that even though the SC400 shares the same engine with the LS400, there are many differences between the two cars, and the turbo projects are specific. So, the one will not fit upon the other. Even the header will be different. I too, will try to give as much details as possible so you can duplicate this project in your shop or at home. Like LEXTREME’s, this project will be homemade, with very few things being sent out. If you are interested making your Lexus SC400 Single Turbo DIY Kit, stay tuned. Once this is done, a DIY Kit will be available. I am excited to join David Phan in this daring journey. Wish me luck and please feel free to contact my generous sponsors for questions. Without them, this project would not be possible. I thank you all. If you are interested in being a sponsor of this project, please contact me.(mailto:altstadt1@earthlink.net)
This project is currently in final design stage completion, and should be completed and dyno tested by the end of February, 2005.

I will post pics of my car, and the recent mods I have made in preparation for the Turbo.

Excited!!
 

SC400TT

Moderator
My Project Car as it progresses

Here are some pics of preparing my car for FI...

The Car is going through both exterior and mechanical mods. Just a Pic of my baby in my driveway for exterior reference.

You now see the Install of the MV Automatics Stage 1 Shift Kit. It is a reworked Valve Body, solenoids, and spring that allows the Auto trans to shift much quicker, and with more force. I can now easily chirp the tires between gears, and the engine is only modded with a BFI, and K&N Filter. Once I install the new TC and GT40, it's gonna get fun...

Ryan
 

SC400TT

Moderator
I initially decided to go with the GT40 due to its wheel being 30% more efficient than its predecessors, and that I was under the impression that it can spool up more quickly than the T70, plus the difference in spool up between it and a TT setup should be negligible. After further investigation, it will not run significantly cooler than the T70, and it will not spool up faster either. Plus, the Master Power/Garrett T70 is almost $200 less in price, and already has flanges made for it, while the GT40 requires custom flanges to be made. The T70 Turbo will easily provide me with my project goal of a 500+ RWHP daily driver, on pump gas, as well as more for down the road.

Final measurements being done today for T70 turbo application, custom header sizing, header piping, and downpipe location.

Here's a few pics of the GT40 turbo for reference, and I will have pics of the T70 later on tonight to post.

Ryan
 

Lextreme

Just call me "Lex"
Sin,,,
If you want to watch than its $20 per hour....
If you want to help than its $40 per hour
If you want to get involve then its $60 per hour
If you want to get make your own turbo kit then its $80 per hour
 

LEXUSV8NZ

New Member
yeah dad used to have a similar sign in the workshop

Labour = $40
If you want to watch = $50
If you want to help = $60

Logan
 

Jwitty

New Member
Do you get a discount if you bring beer???

Ryan,
Godspeed. I am looking for a DIY kit when one is successfully installed and run for a substantial amount of time. I noticed that you have made modifications to the transmission and was wondering if your 500rwp is going to be distrubuted between one wheel or two. How are you going to make it dual posi? Please complete this project, it would be nice to have hope for the 400 crowd.
 

SC400TT

Moderator
OK, Gang. I am finally getting some movement on my turbo project. Here are the latest updates:

1)One of the most important items- Choosing the Fabricator of the custom header, U-pipe, down-pipe, etc. I have selected David Noble of Blown Engineering. He has lots of experience welding steel, including Stainless. He is fabbing all my pipes out of T304 Stainless. We are about to ordeer the steel. Anybody have any good connections?

2)I have finally made my final decision on the Project design, and the specific components, mainly the turbo. I am definitely going with the Garrett GT40 with a 82 mm, 50 Trim, .58 AR Compressor & 77 mm, 73 Trim, .94 AR Turbine. Should produce up to 1100 CFM @ 15 PSI, but I do not plan to run that level of boost at this time. I plan to run 7-8 PSI, which should generate approximately 900 CFM, and generate around 600 HP at the crank, giving me somewhere in the vicinity of 450-500 HP at the rear wheels.

3)I am not decompressing the engine at this time, and am running it at stock levels to keep power up at the low end. Remember, my car is a street car, not a track car, so I am not that interested in high HP top end power, I am more interested in low end grunt, quick spooling, surge free performance and excellent driveability.

4)Definitely going with Tial for the wastegate and BOV. 40 mm WG, and 50 mm BOV.

5)I placed the order with Joe @ TPS today, and paid in full for the Turbo, BOV & WG. I will post pics up when I get them next week.

6)Going with a custom water to air intercooler based upon Ken Bells designs. This IC will keep the air temps at approximately 10-15 degrees above ambient, therby increasing my HP dramatically. Dave Noble is building this as well.

7)Everything else previously mentioned is to be the same for this project.

8)BTW, we are jigging it, and will produce a "kit" for other SC owners.

9)David Noble will be talking to JBrady soon to discuss fabbing the headers for the NA applications.

Cheers...

Ryan
 

SCV8

New Member
Stainless Specialties in Florida has a nice selection of bends, good luck, and keep us posted.
 

Tsibred

New Member
Water to Air intercooler will dramatically affect Daily Driving as well, unless you plan on running an aluminum radiator for the W-A intercooler as well. FMIC are slightly less efficient, but the utmost daily driveable. The ice in the resevoir it self will be melted after 15-20 seconds of hard acceleration. Then its off to the gas station for another bag of ice. On another note, I love you turbo, I have the same one on my eclipse, all though I have a custom exhaust side since it's not a v8.
 

Lextreme

Just call me "Lex"
I agree with TSi. For daily driver and low boost. Dont hassel with the water to air. Its alot more work and money and doesnt really help much with street driving. If your car is for drag then that would be a different story. Once the water heat up like, then its almost useless. FMIC is much easier, cheap and more applicable to your need.
 

SC400TT

Moderator
Guys:

My understanding is that this water to air IC will be effeective for approximately 60 seconds of constant boost. When am I going to be in boost that long on the highway? This is not a track car. I will research it some more, and if this is not the best option, I will go with air to air.

Ryan
 

Zuffen

Super Moderator
Staff member
You need to keep in mind what you are trying to cool down.

Initially you want the intercooler core as cold as you can get it. The intercooler is not capable of supplying constant air at the off-boost tempurature when o n-boost. The core acts as a bank of coolness. As the boost rises the intercooler core starts to heat up. In doing so it absorbs heat from the air being forced through it by the compressor. This is where your cooling effect comes from. The air is not being cooled by the air flowing over the intercooler fins. The shortcoming of air to air is that the bank of cool intercooler is not all that large. The benefit of large air to air intercoolers over small air to air units is they weigh more/have more mass to heat up cool down.

With air to water you have a smaller bank in the cool intercooler with a larger reserve in the cool water water to flow through it.

Whilst air to air is easier to do it is not as effective as air to water. It is for this reason the likes of FORD and Jaguar (to name 2) use air to water intercooling on their engines. I know FORD did some air to air but on big engines they use air to water. These companies are chasing engine reliability and performance.

If air to air was better or more efficient/reliable they would use it and pocket the savings.

A good test is to take two coke bottles. Fill one with water and leave the other empty leave their lids on.

Cool them to the same tempurature, but don't freeze them (leave them in the refrigerator for a day) then put them in the sun and see which one remains cold the longest.

In this test the sun represents the air being blown thru the intercooler which is heating the intercooler (bottle) surface. We all know the bottle full of water will remain cold a lot longer than the empty bottle due to it's mass.

Whilst we may not drive on full boost all the time I think you would use boost more than you think and for longer than you think on a long hill, on a freeway or towing a trailer.

Myself I'm going air to water when my Eaton goes on the car.
 

SC400TT

Moderator
Zuffen said:
You need to keep in mind what you are trying to cool down.

Initially you want the intercooler core as cold as you can get it. The intercooler is not capable of supplying constant air at the off-boost tempurature when o n-boost. The core acts as a bank of coolness. As the boost rises the intercooler core starts to heat up. In doing so it absorbs heat from the air being forced through it by the compressor. This is where your cooling effect comes from. The air is not being cooled by the air flowing over the intercooler fins. The shortcoming of air to air is that the bank of cool intercooler is not all that large. The benefit of large air to air intercoolers over small air to air units is they weigh more/have more mass to heat up cool down.

With air to water you have a smaller bank in the cool intercooler with a larger reserve in the cool water water to flow through it.

Whilst air to air is easier to do it is not as effective as air to water. It is for this reason the likes of FORD and Jaguar (to name 2) use air to water intercooling on their engines. I know FORD did some air to air but on big engines they use air to water. These companies are chasing engine reliability and performance.

If air to air was better or more efficient/reliable they would use it and pocket the savings.

A good test is to take two coke bottles. Fill one with water and leave the other empty leave their lids on.

Cool them to the same tempurature, but don't freeze them (leave them in the refrigerator for a day) then put them in the sun and see which one remains cold the longest.

In this test the sun represents the air being blown thru the intercooler which is heating the intercooler (bottle) surface. We all know the bottle full of water will remain cold a lot longer than the empty bottle due to it's mass.

Whilst we may not drive on full boost all the time I think you would use boost more than you think and for longer than you think on a long hill, on a freeway or towing a trailer.

Myself I'm going air to water when my Eaton goes on the car.
Zuffen:

Although I am calling it water to air, I was referring to air to water. So, thanks for correcting me. The theory you described is exactly what was described to me about the workings of the intercooler being designed for my car. So hopefully this will be the correct solution...

Ryan
 
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