IS350 D4 Injection - High Tech -

milnersXcoupe

New Member
Yes, this is the 2GR-FSE direct-injection V6 -
and as the pictures were SO cool - and the
Technology is carrying to the V8 460 -
I couldn't resist - so Enjoy !




http://tinyurl.com/ocycz


-quote-

If you look at the first picture, you can see that Toyota has avoided the usual cutaway techniques and instead takes a slice from the middle of the block. This chunk o' engine is motorized, and runs up and down while the engine is on display. It makes it difficult to see what's going on in the bottom end, but does an excellent job of showing off the top end.

Check out the vertical intake runners; this looks more like velocity stacks on a race engine than something we'd find in a luxury automobile.




Check out the cool little roller rockers that are used to transfer motion from the cam lobes to the valves. They add a bit of packaging height, but they also multiply valve lift and therefore require smaller cam lobes. There's the benefit of reduced friction as well.


We can also see the coil-on-plug (COP) assembly tucked between the two camshafts. It's extremely slender, and allows a narrow "included valve angle". This is important for two reasons: 1) Quite simply, it reduces packaging bulk; and 2) Narrower valve angles lend themselves to better intake and exhaust port geometry. The size of this coil is one of those "little details" that impacts so much of the engine's design.

The real story, though, lies just above and below the intake runner. You can see that there are actually two injectors for each cylinder - the top one is a standard port fuel injector, while the bottom one injects fuel directly into the combustion chamber. The two injection systems are used together to optimize the fueling over the engine's operational envelope.




As described in the January 2006 issue of SAE Automotive Engineering International, the system primarily relies on the port injection system when low engine speeds are combined with high loadings. Under these conditions, a direct injection scheme cannot properly atomize the fuel, and so approximately 60% of the fuel is provided by the port injector. As engine speed increases, the direct injection system takes over more of the fueling responsibility, until eventually it provides 100% of the necessary go-juice. Obviously, there some complex calculations going on to determine the optimum fueling over the engine's operating range, and that has led to over 300 patents being issued to Toyota concerning the design of this system.

There's a 7% increase in HP and 7.5% increase in torque from the system, some of which comes from the 11.8:1 compression ratio that's enabled by the use of direct injection. Better yet, the benefits apply to the entire powerband, so this is a feature that will be useful to most any driver.

The dual injection system also reduces cold-start emissions. The port injection system dumps a bit of fuel on the back of the closed intake valve; when that valve opens, the fuel is evenly distributed throughout the cylinder. As the piston approaches the top of its travel, the direct system injects a bit more fuel into the cavity on top of the piston. The total air/fuel mixture in the combustion chamber is slightly lean, but the mixture is significantly richer in the area around the spark plug, making it easier to ignite in a cold engine. The result is quicker warm-up and smoother operation when cold.

The engine produces 306 HP at 6400 RPM, and 277 lb-ft at 4800 RPM; a remarkable accomplishment for a luxury-car V6.
 

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cribbj

"Supra" Moderator
Staff member
Yeah, rockers in a Toyota motor. Who woulda thunk it. What's this world coming to? I was really disappointed when I read about that aspect of this motor a few months back. Not that they didn't have good engineering reasons to do it, but.... Toyota motors have always been about direct cam actuated valves (well, through buckets & shims of course...)

And they've gone with an even narrower included valve angle than ever. Sorry, but I'm just not a fan of narrow valve angles. To me, narrow angle geometry makes it just that much harder to get the air/fuel in, and the exhaust out in a real world engine. But I'm hardheaded about some things, and just an enthusiast nowadays, not an engine developer.

Thankfully they haven't abandoned their DOHC tradition and gone with a cam in block design, too........

This motor certainly has lots of neat new features, like that dual injection system, but it looks to me like on the whole, it's all about low rpm torque, smoothness, and BSFC, which is what we've come to expect from Toyota in recent years.

Bah, humbug ;-)
 

milnersXcoupe

New Member
384 carrots

I did read but failed to Bookmark, of the Supercharged version TRD has planned being fielded at 335HP.

One other article had the engine spinning 8,000 rpm - making 450HP.

Engine weight is a svelte 384lbs. and the 4.0 version in Trucks are stuffing
4.6 Cobras with ease - check the You Tube.com videos.

It seems that picking up rpm and all the weight of a V8 provides the 1GR
a launch advantage - and with the 94mm bore / 95mm stroke [ 3.7"] - Torque is not a problem.

I'd like to see the 2 GR FSE fitted with the 1 GR shortblock - 95mm stroke vs 83mm in a stock 2 GR FSE and Turbo'd.

Word is that the 1 GR rods are Factory Forged items - leaving only pistons
to swap out.

These engines have their individual cylinder liner/block material fully exposed to coolant - avoiding the Hot Spots that plague FORD DOHC.

Even the vaunted New 5.7 has siamese'd cylinders which begs the question
are there unforseen problems on the horizon for those 5.7 owners who Supercharge / Turbocharge their engines?

Once the aftermarket combs thru the ECM maps for these D4 engines,
Turbocharging might bring these Ultra-Lite engines into the 500HP streetable range - and at 384Lbs. vehicle handling will improve as well.

Yeah, they do sound something like those V6 Camaro power plants, but I found a sound .wav file on the German WW-II push/pull DORNIER Do-335 'Arrow' the other nite that REALLY sounds like what these GR motors emit.....
maybe it was that Sushi / Saki mix I was hammering ....dunno.... I'll have to get back to you on that......:439:
 

Toysrme

Member
they went with rockers because they dno't have space for directly overhead cam anymore. The heads bearly fit in the engine bays already.
FE heads are still very compact, while the direct injection FSE heads are all GIGANTIC. lol!
While I especially appreciate any v6 related post on here, this is all seriously old information lol.





TRD will never offer an aftermarket supercharger for another v6 or v8 from the factory. They've had huge reliability issues on every one they've ever done. It will just never happen.

Engine weight is a svelte 384lbs. and the 4.0 version in Trucks are stuffing
4.6 Cobras with ease - check the You Tube.com videos.
Ya but 4.6L's are a joke lol!
The weight is 399lbs. (all #GR-FSE v6's weigh between 392-399lbs)
It seems that picking up rpm and all the weight of a V8 provides the 1GR
a launch advantage - and with the 94mm bore / 95mm stroke [ 3.7"] - Torque is not a problem.

I'd like to see the 2 GR FSE fitted with the 1 GR shortblock - 95mm stroke vs 83mm in a stock 2 GR FSE and Turbo'd.
They wont mate. Plus the new blocks are shitty. Open deck = complete trash.
Word is that the 1 GR rods are Factory Forged items - leaving only pistons
to swap out.
All GR and UR blocks use forged connecting rods, however they are forged so they can be made smaller & lighter with the same tolerances. Not to greatly increase strength.
These engines have their individual cylinder liner/block material fully exposed to coolant - avoiding the Hot Spots that plague FORD DOHC.
Ya and it's total bullshit. 1gr-fe's have been out the longest, and they've already begun spitting rods out the side of the block, or having the walls & liners crack from vibration problems.
Toyota did install block protector plates... That's better than most OEM open deck engines. The problem is that plastic doesn't work. It needs to be atleast posted, or prefferably manly aluminum block protection plates tigged into the block correctly.
Once the aftermarket combs thru the ECM maps for these D4 engines,
Turbocharging might bring these Ultra-Lite engines into the 500HP streetable range - and at 384Lbs. vehicle handling will improve as well.
The aftermarket will never come to tune OBD-II Toyota. If you want more power, you'll need an injector swap + management solution.


Plus... The 3.0L, and 3.4L v6's from 15 years ago can do 500-550 without being rebuilt now. LoL all they're doing now is making it more costly. :D












They make great power to weight ratios tho. The 2gr-fse is currently around .76 bhp per lb while the 2gr-fe Camry engine is only 359lbs, is pysically much smaller, and has .75bhp per lb.

I honestly see no reason why the 2gr-fe would not make 295bhp with a correctly made y-pipe instead of the bullshit y-pipe toyota designed for it. Keeping with their trend of completely choking the transverse v6's poer abilities at the y-pipe.
:'(
 

Toysrme

Member
My only reservation abot Gr and UR engines are the open blocks.
You know $500-750 spent on protector plates custom fabbed & put in. Then the problem is solved. But it's just one more thing to screw with. Personally I would NEVER put either block under much strain with power adders.


I dont think I could bring myself to go FI on any of them, beyond say a measily 50 wet shot. In my person experiances thus far, they seem fragile.
 
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