How to convert hydraulic clutch fan with electric fans.

jibby

New Member
Lowboy NZ - That is what I thought a peice of cake.... Well check this... First off you need to remove the radiator and fan assembly, hose lines etc..., no biggie, then you need to remove the serp belt and all that plastic crap around the engine bay...Way over kill on the plastic stuff by Lexus... anyway then the fun starts for me atleast, I go to remove the Hydraulic pump pulley to assess the removal nuts on the pump and the main pulley nut strips out on me... I even lubed the nut realising it has not been removed in 14 years. After it stripped I put the puller tool on it and pulled while turning the nut and nothing. I figured maybe these import engines have reverse threading on the pulley's and it stripped that way. I always use the old rule (righty tighty and lefty loosey) well I guess maybe it didn't apply to this job....Or it just stripped out anyway...

So now I need to grind off the bolt, save the pulley and thrash the hydraulic pump...Then tomarrow go find a replacement pump to gut at the junk yards. Getting the pump for cheap should not be a problem but grinding that nut off will require some work. Done for the day here are some boring progress pic's of the nut that refuses to come off.... This is not just an easy job, and I still need to remove the pump, plug the lines, mount and install the new fan yet, hook up the heat sensor, etc...trust me this job is not a piece of cake, doable but not a piece of cake....but so far I am having fun I guess and it is coming along...

I included a before engine picture and will post an after one as well. I better gain a few ponies off this swap after all this.....Late-
 

jibby

New Member
Did you guys know there is a tool that splits nuts check this out, I discovered this tool today.....
 

LOWBOY NZ

New Member
hehe you struck all the problems i had, i should have told you it was a reverse thread. It may be easier for you to buy a second hand viscous fan unit from the early models. Just remove the viscous unit and fan and the housing will bolt in the same place as the old hydraulic pump. Looks like you have the same motor i had which also came out in the 91' GT Limited Toyota Soarer judging by the oil filter position.
 

jibby

New Member
Hey I learned alot about this fan swap and it is really easy if you know what you are doing, man I wish I would have known what I know now.... Thanks for the tips, I got that nut off but the threads were gone on the pump stud so I removed the pump stud and am having a machinest re-thread and supply a locking nut for $40.... I did remove the star shaped vanes/spleens to the pump and now it spins without load and is disabled mechanically... Here are some pics of the job...The two bolts -the smaller one is a plug for the uppper oil line block and is the same thread size. The fan is now mounted on the radiator, and the job is almost over... The one final question I have is I am a little nervous about using the thermo stick provided with the electric fan. I would much rather use the stock therm sensor, I am trying to figure which is best way to go with this..and how..Any ideas on that????
 

jibby

New Member
Oh, and you do not need to remove the pump from the block and all the plastic crap around the engine to do this job, it is so easy and goes like this- remove the stock hydraulic fan and radiator, remove the serp belt, turn bolt on pully (lefty!!!)and remove. Then find the stongest puller tool you can and POP off that pulley. Remove 6 bolts and the pump comes apart and the two vains just slide out, re-assemble pump and it is solid and turns freely...Then fill pump half way with fluid to keep the bearings lubed and then plug the two in and out lines located at the block that is it... Reinstall the pulley, serp belt and your electric fan. Job over...oh and then you can remove all the stock cooler and hose crap under the battery....and looking over the stock pump I do think this will free up horsepower in what contrary to what some people may think and also weight reduction. ....Thank you everyone for the help, I hope these pictures help others to come...

Coffee- I read your posts in this thread on the fan hookup and thermo switch I am still unclear on what you did? Did you use the provided thermo stick or thermo switch that came with your electric fan or did you wire into the stock heat temp sensor to activate the newly installed electric fan? I noticed the stock sensor is locate near the bottom of the radiator and screws in to it where as the actual sensor makes contact with the hot fluids... That sensor seems so much more reliable then the thremo stick heat sensor you insert into the radiator fins? Little advise if possible as I am nearing an end to this job would be appreciated?
 

jibby

New Member
Progress update, re-machined the stripped stud and now it is like new. $40. Installed the dual fan on the radiator, peice of cake and used the existing mounting holes on the radiator, no drilling for new holes needed. It is Ready to install in the car...Hydraulic pump upper oil line plugged, one more to go... That is it...Looking forward to the finished product...I also decided I will use the provided thermo stick with the electric fan to read radiator temp for activation. I figured it would be too hard to try and wire the fan into the stock heat sensor.. It should be fine. The cool part of the dual electric fan is if one fan goes out the other will still work, they are seperately wired..I now feel secure that this fan will be reliable..Here are a few more pic's.

One last issue I need to address is how to fill the hydraulic pump up with ATP fluid before sealing off, as the two in and out oil lines sit lower then the actual pump. I can try and fill the pump up to where I opened it up and removed the vanes (as shown in the pic's), but that may not be enough fluid.. I will think this one over...I will be plugging the lower pump oil line with a short rubber hose, plug and two clamps..

Also changed my caps and rotors, the originals were in really bad shape..to my suprise.
 

jibby

New Member
Ok change of plans update - After thinking about plugging the two pump in and out lines that actually sit lower then the hydraulic pump itself, I decided to connect the fan tank and two hoses looping rather then plugging the lines at the block.. Why, because this will allow the pump to be 100% full or ATP fluid at all times and also allows for heat expansion. I feared with plugging the pump lines at the block, the seals might blow out from heat, or the pump itself may overheat with limited fluid in it if plugged... So this is a crude pic of the fan tank and where it will mount, I will clean up the look and mount later, now the fan goes in...See ya
 

jibby

New Member
Finished product- Relocated the fan holding tank next to the fuse box, used small self tapping screws, rubber washers, a holding strap to secure the fan tank, and used ties to keep the hoses together..also had to use a little extending bracket to securely mount the radiator holding tank next to the Air Filter.. I have a little wiring left to do and need to get my widened and altered rear rims back before I can road test. Although, I cranked it up and so far so good, all is secure and tight..Hear are some more pic's.. I may still choose another mounting plan for the fan holding tank, but this strap is secure and will hold for a long time...
 

fuzz!

New Member
wow.. she's so beeaauuutiful..

thanks for the good writeup and all the pictures.

i can't believe how much room you've got between the front of the engine and the radiator. i've barely got enough room for a playing card. :(
 

jcclures

New Member
I had the same problem with my conversion into my Nissan patrol as I was using electric fans, what I found was that the tensioner pulley of a VL Holden Commodore was very easy to fit onto the existing oil pump housing. By doing this I only used the main pump housing to hold the pulley bolt. All I had to do then was buy a new belt 75 mm shorter, which was no problem
 

jibby

New Member
Fuzz- Tons of room now, I was amazed myself, thanks.

Jcclures - I almost did bypass the Hydraulic pump completely and run a shorter serp. belt but I did not feel comfortable with the amount of belt griping to the crank pulley. It would have reduced the grab of the belt by over %50, so I did not want belt slipage at full throttle with a shorter setup. This setup should work fine the way it is now and there is no load on the hydro pump at all, so I believe this is the best way to go it just takes a little more work....
 

jibby

New Member
:sorry: FAILURE ON THE SWAP!!!!! Well as I was beggining to suspect the hydraulic pump overheated with the still ATP fluid inside the pump and that blew the seals. The bearing is toast.. THE HYDRAULIC FAN PUMP CANNOT BE BYPASSED due to heat...removing the vains is horse crap... I was lucky to make it home with fluid flying everywhere under my hood, a slipping serp belt, and a squeeling pump bearing. I must now delete the hydro pump completely, fan tank, hose lines, etc.. and use a shorter serp belt or find a fast replacement idler puller that will stand in place of the hydro pump pulley.. Engine is a mess, and this is dissapointing to say the least... Anyway a minor set back that will be corrected..On a brighter note the fans work better then I expected in 90 degree heat and the A/C on...

Any info on the replacement idler pulley would be greatly appreciatied and would be my first choice.....
 

Zuffen

Super Moderator
Staff member
This modification has been done dozens of times and no one has had a problem. Well maybe one person.

I think you need to look carfully at what you've done to see where and why it failed.
 

jibby

New Member
I did everthing right and made sure the pump was full of fliud. I can't see any other failure happening besides the overheating of the standing ATP fluid in the pump and the pump being so close to the heated engine. The bearing made noise yesterday and the seals blew out today... Fluid was in the pump, what else could it be? I think the vain removal is a bad idea and not going to work and I don't recommend it!!! Look at the pic, I even bled all the air out of the pump.. Sealed back up tightly. Tell me where I went wrong? One other member said that the same thing happen to him... So I don't know Zuf. Anyway, time to move on...you know of any alternatives, any reported crank slippage with the shorter serp belt?
 

LOWBOY NZ

New Member
Just by pass it dude i never ran the idler on my set up and it never slipped.... I think i used a 6pk1650 6 rib belt but you mite just want to run a measuring tape through the set up and make sure it will fit. You may run into issues when the air con. clutch disengauges but hey you can only try these things.
 

jibby

New Member
Lowboy- thanks for the heads up on this!!!!!.... I am getting the shorter belt this morning and have already measured for the size. I am glad you report no slipage, that is good news. I hope it won't mess with my A/C, that is one option I will cannot live without...I need to chill out at times...see ya....
 

jibby

New Member
Well guys here is the shorter serp belt setup, do you think there is enough grab on the crank pulley for it not to slip? It's looks a little sketchy to me. I will try this out for now til I can find an alternative. Deleting the hydro pump next....much cleaner look now....
 

jcclures

New Member
I thought that I would show what I did with my pump housing.

I hope the images work.

I first remover the housing from the engine block, then removed all the pump and fittings. I then drilled a ½ inch hole through the pump housing then put a ½ bolt from the back of the housing, “the bolt had to clear the timing belt” I made a locking plate for it which you cannot see, this was to stop the bolt from turning when you do up the front nut.

This is the bolt.

http://www.lextreme.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=2909&stc=1

I then used the tensioner pulley from a VN v6 commodore with an adaptor which I made.
These are the parts I used.

http://www.lextreme.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=2910&stc=1

This is the adaptor in the pump housing.

http://www.lextreme.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=2911&stc=1

This is the adaptor in the pulley.

http://www.lextreme.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=2912&stc=1

This is the finished result.

http://www.lextreme.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=2913&stc=1

The adaptor carries the pulley not the bolt, the bolt just holds the pulley on tight. I had to use a shorter belt as the pulley is smaller than original one.

This was very easy to do as I made all the parts in my own workshop, I think anyone should be able to do the conversion.
 

jibby

New Member
jcclure- Hey thanks alot for the post and pic's. It's funny that is the same thing I had thought up and am trying to do now. However, there is a problem with lining up the belt to the newly placed bearing idler pulley. The displacement/offset is way off. I also was going to spot weld the pulley stud in place and add spacer to get the offset just right. I fried the bearing so there is a little play with the stud... I also need to make a spacer like you did..

How did your ECU re-act to the sensor and power to the pump being disconnected? You may be using a different ECU on your truck swap...Here are my pic's to show you I am doing the same thing. I am using a shorter serp belt for now...Good work!!!!
 

jibby

New Member
Figured it out, took me a while, here is what I came up with: forget about removing the pump and all the engine plastic, waste of time...This is real easy and cheap.. I found a universal bearing idler as shown above for $20. You can buy one at just about any auto parts store, just make sure it has it's own bearing. Found a 2 inch long hardened bolt 3/8 to fit snug in and thru the pulley idler hole, (I used plumbing sleeves to reduce the hole size in this perticular pulley which doesn't need to be done). Now, there are six open thread holes on the pump to choose from and I found one that would work just perfect. Got me a 3/8 drill and tap a few washers and the job was over in 20 minutes, no pump removal, altering, machine work, etc.. Piece of cake, check the pics and you will get it step by step. You will need an angle drill if you don't remove the radiator... I just need to measure up for the new serp belt and that is it...Total cost $40...Pump bypassed....

Note: The drilling hole is already made so making it larger is like drilling thru butter, and tap threading is very easy as well on this metal. The threads go deep and there is alot of metal to work with, a perfect position for the idler pulley....I recommend lock washers and thread locker when bolting down, and additional washers/spacers can be used to get the right offset to line up the belt and pulley... I think this is the best way to go with the least amount of work. What do you guys think?
 
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