87 4Runner 1UZ swap, get comfy

gloverman

Well-Known Member
Or better still is to replace the brittle connectors. I'm doing yet another one today headed back into a Daimler. Lots of new connectors and It will live again. Easiest way is to remove the loom. Very few I do in place. Much easier on the bench. And I want reliability so no way I'm leaving brittle connectors in there to give the chance of them causing issues.

For the back blank on the TB I use a frost plug. They also fit nicely.
 

numbchux

Member
The connectors are generally only a problem if they have to be removed, at which point they can be replaced anyway.

Ideally, I'd pull it off the motor, strip all the loom and tape off it, and spend several hours sorting through exactly what I need, and getting rid of what I don't. But with a 2-year-old daughter, and plenty of other projects on my plate, I usually only work on it for an hour or so at a time. Leaving it on the motor not only prevents unnecessary connector breakage, but helps keep it organized. With the engine on my little cart, and a rolling stool, it's pretty easy to get to what I need where it is.

I've probably done 100 Subaru swap harnesses over the years, and always off the engine, but those use 2 or 3 big connectors to separate the engine sub-harness from the bulkhead. So you don't have to touch all that crap on the engine (of course, then you have to remove the whole dash to get the ECU side out....).
 

numbchux

Member
Thanks to gloverman for the tip....I found the part number for the coolant cap from the non-EGR engine to cap off the 2 ports on the rear bridge for the EGR/IAC/TB pipes, and ordered a pair from the dealership. Reused a couple clamps (not pictured).


2019-03-20_04-10-22
by Numbchux, on Flickr

Also the vacuum caps for the smaller ports on the TB, and back of the intake (for the water valve VSV), 9033903005
 

numbchux

Member
All unneeded wires removed, needed wires coiled and marked, still a few to clean up and some stuff to add, but nearing the end. I added 2 wires up the run under the throttle body to the thermostat housing to add another temp switch for fan control. I'm also going to add a few wires up along the lower part of the block on the LH side for oil pressure. I'm going to put the 4Runner pressure sensor there and use the one wire for the factory gauge, but I just discovered Toyobd1 and the ability to add a 5v referenced sensor that can be read/logged that way.

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by Numbchux, on Flickr

I found a 3/4" oil-resistant hose to replace the section from the throttle body to valve cover. It's much thicker walled, so I test-fit the intake manifold to make sure everything still fits (it's tight, but it does).


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by Numbchux, on Flickr

Looks so good without all the vacuum lines and valves for the EGR on there.

In the process of the test-fit, I snagged the supply line for the cold start injector and tore it. I cut the crimps off the fittings, and pulled the hose off (looks like it was originally Nylon). Looks like it's 4mm ID, so I'm going to see if I can source some fuel-injection grade hose (Gates lists a part number for 1/8", but all the online sources want to sell 25 feet at a time) and reuse the fittings. Otherwise I'm looking for a used one.



I discovered that an LS400 power steering pump not only would have the reservoir mounted right to it, but it also has the idle-up valve mounted to the body of the pump instead of in the line. So I'm on the lookout for one of those (really hoping my semi-local UPull yard gets one in the next couple months)
 

Zuffen

Super Moderator
Staff member
Don't worry too much about the idle up valve on the power steering.

I've 1UZ's in my Rover for 15 years and never had one connected.

The pump had the plastic nipples broken and it works fine so if you can't find a replacement try it and see how you find it.
 

numbchux

Member
Don't worry too much about the idle up valve on the power steering.

I've 1UZ's in my Rover for 15 years and never had one connected.

The pump had the plastic nipples broken and it works fine so if you can't find a replacement try it and see how you find it.
Yea, it's a relatively low priority. But would be nice to have. The reservoir would simplify things, and if it comes with the side-effect of adding the idle-up valve, that'd be sweet.
 

numbchux

Member
Another little update. I've been sneaking out to the garage for an hour or so almost every night after the toddler goes to bed...

I wanted to add a temp sensor for an aftermarket fan controller. The radiator would be the ideal spot for it, but since I had to block off ports in the thermostat housing anyway, I opted to put it there. Drilled and tapped for 3/8 NPT. The factory pipe was not centered in the casting, so as I stepped up drill sizes, I was offsetting the hole with the dremel a bit, too. Didn't leave a ton of material, but should be enough, and I used some thread sealant and torqued it a bit less than normal to avoid cracking:

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by Numbchux, on Flickr

I also drilled and tapped the upper one (that went to the IAC, EGR, TB, etc.) for 1/4 NPT and put a plug in there. I can't weld aluminum at home, so this was easier than taking it to someone.

2019-04-05_02-30-43
by Numbchux, on Flickr

I had no luck finding a 1/8", 3/16", or 4mm fuel injection hose to replace the section up to the cold start injector. I did find some 6mm banjo fittings that can be used with 6mm or 1/4" hose, so I ordered those. Not cheap, but I think it'll be a good fix.

Wiring on the 1UZ side is basically done. I'm going to build a nice Bussman fuse/relay block for the engine bay that will house the relays for the engine (as well as new headlight relays, since the factory system sucks). I'm going to wait as long as I can to take the 4Runner out of commission, but since it's already swapped, the wiring is already pretty well laid out for that.

I was hoping to test-run it on the stand this weekend, but the cold start injector line is going to hold that up, probably to the next weekend. That'll settle me a bit on the condition of the engine (the guy I bought it from was clearly mistaken on several details), and then I'll place a couple of the larger parts orders.
 

gloverman

Well-Known Member
If you get really stuck I have cold start injector pipes. Ive blanked off many over the years. I'm pretty sure I can manage to find one still laying around. Just cost of freight.
 

numbchux

Member
If you get really stuck I have cold start injector pipes. Ive blanked off many over the years. I'm pretty sure I can manage to find one still laying around. Just cost of freight.
Thanks a lot! I'm betting freight alone won't be cheap, but I'll keep you in mind if I can't find something closer.



Powered up the system this weekend. A couple makeshift fuse holders and relays to supply power (one controlled by the ECU as-intended). A test light confirms the CEL comes on and flashes in diag mode. I got out a timing light, and I didn't have any spark....I started testing power and grounds, and I noticed there was no ground wire going to the igniters. Bolted the bracket to an unused hole on the engine, and I had spark. So yea, it appears that those are grounded through the bracket. And a multimeter confirms the fuel pump controller providing voltage.

Made a bucket with a fitting for radiator hoses. Just need to finish that fuel line and bolt on the intake, and then set up a makeshift fuel system, and I should be able to test-run it on the stand.
 

gloverman

Well-Known Member
yep. ignitors are earthed through the body.

for little stuff I use the post service so little stuff like this is about 20USD to send. Its the big stuff that gets expensive
 

numbchux

Member
Well, crap. That would have been cheaper. Well, I already bought the parts to make my own, and tracking shows they're delivered today. If I don't like it, I'll shoot you a message.
 

numbchux

Member
Alright, finally got some time this weekend.

Made a new cold start hose. Bought some 8mm banjo to 1/4" barb adapters, a chunk of 1/4" fuel injection hose, and a crimp-style clamp set. I'm quite happy with the results. The larger diameter hose did prevent the banjo from sitting flush on the rail, so I stacked an extra crush washer under the banjo to space it up. I don't love it, but I pressurized the system and it didn't leak.

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by Numbchux, on Flickr


And, I ran it on the stand. I pulled a fuel pump out of a Subaru parts car I bought recently, first I hardwired it just to pressurized the system and look for leaks, then wired it in to the controller. The ECU connector with the bolt through it was not plugged in all the way, so it didn't pop over right away, I tightened that and hooked up my timing light to check again, and it started right up. Scared the hell out of me!

I had the radiator hoses hooked to a bucket of coolant, so I was able to run it for probably 20 minutes or so (and even then, the thermostat only barely opened). Seems to run really well, revs well. I took a few videos, I'd like to edit it a bit before I upload, so hopefully I can do that this week. One cylinder on the LH bank seemed to drop for 30 seconds or so, but the plugs and wires are not in good shape, so I'm inclined to think that's the culprit.

So, I ordered another round of parts (including plugs and wires). And I started taking the ECU apart to replace the capacitors (Even though I'm quite confident with my soldering iron, I wanted to make sure it ran before I messed with anything).


I was hoping to keep it simple, and keep the engine/transmission bolted together. But I do want to install a shift kit, and swap the shift shaft for a 4WD one to relocate the linkage to the other side. Looks like this all would be much better done with the transmission upside-down.....
 

numbchux

Member
New Capacitors installed in the ECU last week, and test-ran the engine again on Friday.

Also checked for "the most common wiring mistake", and passed.

So now comes a bunch of parts ordering and a bit more teardown to really get things for a clean install.
 

numbchux

Member
Another little update

Paint...

2019-04-25_02-37-45
by Numbchux, on Flickr

Transmission is off, pan is off, extension is off, rolled it on it's side so I can get at the valve body. I'm going to replace the manual shift shaft (so I can use the 4WD linkage on the other side), and install a transgo shift kit, and modify for the T100 transfer case.

Got a couple boxes of electrical supplies. A PDM would have done all of this, but at nearly 10x the cost....Bussmann 5-relay and 10-fuse box (ignition, EFI, hi and lo headlight relays), 70amp relay for starter, Derale adjustable fan controller (I've heard of this burning up, so I'm going to use a much smaller fuse, and if that blows, I'll use it to control the 5th relay in the box), Mega fuse holder for alternator, and J-case fuse holder for the stock AM1 and AM2 fuses. This will replace the factory fuse/relay box, I'll bend up some sheet metal (aluminum probably, or maybe diamond plate...) to make a surface to mount this all to.


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by Numbchux, on Flickr

20190430_181248~01 by Numbchux, on Flickr

One exhaust manifold is removed and degreased. Both oxygen sensors left their threads in the manifolds, so I got to dig out my M18x1.5 tap, I got them cleaned out on the one manifold.

Soon I'll bring the truck into the garage (assuming it stops snowing this year...)
 

numbchux

Member
Transmission work.

4WD shift shaft. I used the VIN from the 4Runner that I got the shifter assembly at the junkyard to look this up:
20190513_174415 by Numbchux, on Flickr

Remove the external linkage parts, loosen the nut on the neutral switch, the drill the dimple out of this thin collar, and a roll pin can be pounded out. Then the shaft slides out:
20190513_212100 by Numbchux, on Flickr

Here's the old collar and pin:
20190513_212141 by Numbchux, on Flickr

New pin, collar, shift shaft seals, and shaft, and it's ready for the linkage on the other side of the transmission.



Installing a transgo shift kit while it's apart.
20190513_214020 by Numbchux, on Flickr
 

numbchux

Member
Had an issue when I went to put the lock up valve in. The supplied part doesn't fit in the sleeve in my transmission.

Well, I got an email back from Transgo: "Our TCC valve assembly will not fit that application. You will have to reuse the original or get a replacement from Toyota/Lexus. #Toyota p/n 35215-30020"

Here's the sleeve that in my trans: http://www.toyodiy.com/parts/xref?s=3521550010&mU=on

And the one the kit is designed-for: http://www.toyodiy.com/parts/xref?s=35215-30020&mU=on


So. I'm going to run it with the stock valve.
 

numbchux

Member
Valve body is back together and back in the transmission.


Almost finished modding the transmission for the transfer case over the weekend. To find the point to drill for the 7th bolt, I sharpened a bolt to use as a center punch.


20190518_150655 by Numbchux, on Flickr


20190518_150703 by Numbchux, on Flickr

Stood the transmission on the bellhousing (note, the little cover over the access holes for the torque converter bolts works great to hold the converter in while separated from the engine) and then used the level built into my drill to drill a vertical hole. Measured the depth needed for the new bolt, plus the nose of the tap (don't have a bottom tap, but there's enough meat), and marked the drill bit with some electrical tape. Then tapped for the new threads.


20190518_154511 by Numbchux, on Flickr

It wasn't perfectly centered, so I gave the hole in the adapter a little tickle with the mill, and it goes great now.

Drilled out the hole for the speed sensor, used some 1/8 (~3.5mm) aluminum strap to make a spacer, and drilled and tapped M6 for the mounting bolt.

20190519_143138 by Numbchux, on Flickr


Cut the output shaft down, and cut the tone wheel down. And test fit everything:

20190519_143126 by Numbchux, on Flickr

I bought a couple set screws today, so I'll finish that tonight or tomorrow (I'll take pictures of the output shaft and tone wheel mod then), and get it together for good.



Very nearly time to bring the truck into the garage. Snowed again yesterday, which is complicating that. And I have to have the wiring in my garage upgraded in about a month (inlaws are visiting in their RV, and I'm sure they'll want to run A/C).
 

numbchux

Member
Shortened output shaft:

20190520_183021 by Numbchux, on Flickr

Modded tone wheel:

20190520_182942 by Numbchux, on Flickr

The set screws had a tapered end on them, but because of how tight the tolerances are, and how thin the metal is on that tone wheel, I ground the tip of the screws flat to get better thread engagement. I put a bit of locktite between the tone wheel and shaft, and on the set screws.

Another test-fit, and took some measurements to calculate my air gap. About 1mm

20190521_024903 by Numbchux, on Flickr


I decided the bearing in the transfer adapter felt a little rough, so I think I'm going to replace it before I get a new one. Not having much luck finding one other than OE. $45 isn't terribly expensive, but seems like I could do better than that. Might press it out and take it to a bearing house.
 
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