Master machinist; greenhorn mechanic

Discussion in 'Engine Modifications (Members Only)' started by Mumf, Jun 30, 2018.

  1. Mumf

    Mumf New Member

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    Hello all,

    I need help here. I own a 1990 ls400. Planning on making a mean sleeper out of it. I can make just about every part under the hood from scratch, but I have no idea where to start as far as the wrenching side if things go.

    So here we go guys. A little patience will go a long way here. I have been reading from afar for a few years.

    I am a master machinist who has made everything from nasty one off jobs to aerospace to gun parts. I have parts in missiles, machine guns, race boats, performance cars, etc. I am willing to fill custom orders for the community here at a discount.

    I just need help getting out of the rookie stage as far as mechanic work is concerned. I would like to reach mastery understanding levels. Does anybody out there have any good study material recommendations? I finally have a basic understanding of engines. Transmissions, however, might as well be an alien spacecraft. I'm basically a dumb blonde when it comes to cars. As a machinist... This is painful.

    I am now a proud member of lextreme. If the community here will help me master mechanic work I will give back in ways only a true old school machinist can. I can also program CNC so if I think of something cool I can Mass produce for us. I have unlimited access to a machine shop and odd tools.

    In summary... Please help me see the light. I need books, prints, specifications, wire schematics, how do I program this beast, how do I take grandpa out of the transmission, etc. I want to understand this car down to every last nut and bolt. Who's got a PDF of the maintenance Bible? 300 bones for the set?!

    Explain it to me like I'm five. There is a computer? What computer do I need to talk to the car computer? I hear chips are garbage. Refer me to books, link me to other posts, anything to help me get through the learning curve faster.

    Thank you everyone for your patience. I'll hook it up fat for the community. I'll take photos, draw prints, make parts, assist prototypes, etc. Lextreme has been a big inspiration in my desire to learn another trade. Been cranking handles since I was eight. High time to start cranking wrenches. Time to wake up the 1uz.

    Glad to finally be here!


    Thanks everybody,

    Mumf
     
  2. cribbj

    cribbj "Supra" Moderator Staff Member

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    Hey Mumf, welcome to the forum. We need people like you!!!

    IMHO, the best way to learn about these great engines is to read first, then wrench. The New Car Features (NCF) files are a treasure trove of great info, especially for new guys trying to learn more about the UZ engines. Send me a PM with your email addy and I'll load you up with tech info.

    For wrenching, buy a cheap engine on eBay and take it apart and see if you can put it back together. Don't mess with your "good" engine.
     
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  3. Mumf

    Mumf New Member

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    Thanks! I couldn't agree more. It's my daily driver right now so I'm not about to tear it up. I have an old 80s Dodge power ram I'm going to attempt a rebuild on. I want to rebuild the tranny too though since I'm going that deep. Want to paint the frame with some kind of Marine anti rust paint because they salt the roads here in Utah. Just gotta do my homework on transmissions. I hear they are easy to damage. If I do mess up, who cares! It's a mopar. I'll shoot you a pm. I see you are a staff member. If you guys have any prototype work you need some precision machining done on give me a holler. Thanks again. Super excited to be here.
     
    Last edited: Jul 2, 2018

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